What Needs to be Done When Someone Dies?

Death is very painful but inevitable! Perhaps you have found yourself here due to the death of a loved one, death of a spouse, husband or wife – perhaps it is agonizing? You feel numb? 

 

It was unexpected? Perhaps you’ve been told a loved one does not have too long to live and are here to mentally prepare yourself and see what lies ahead.

 

The passing of a loved one can leave us with a burden of emotions especially as you deal with the aftermath of death.

 

There are many questions – what do I do next? Who do I contact? What support is available for me? 

 

With the knowledge that we have picked up along our journeys we are here to make the process as seamless and clear as possible.

 

This in-depth guide of what needs to be done when someone dies will cover a step by step process of the ins and outs of what to do after someone dies before arranging the funeral.

 

The process will include how to get a medical certificate, register the death, what to do if your loved one died abroad, who to notify after the death as well as information about organ donation.

 

Where the Person Died and the Processes that Follow

 

Who to notify after a death?


Besides the somewhat burdening, agonising and exhausting process of informing family and friends of the death of a loved one, there are also other organisations that need to be informed too, a workplace, educational establishments, tax office are some of many that need to be informed. Tell Us Once is a free service that enables you to report a death to most government organisations at once, making the process easier and less exhausting and emotionally draining. When you use Tell Us Once, they will notify the following services: DWP pensions and benefits Personal tax Council tax Passport Driving licence Blue Badge Electoral register Some public sector pension schemes




Who else needs to be notified after death?


The financial institutions have established something similar to the government's tell us once system which is called the death notification Service. It is a free service that allows you to inform a number of banks and credit card companies about the death of your loved one at the same time. It does appear that individual contact needs to be made to other organisations to notify them of the death of your loved one. Bill providers Work place Educational institutions Mortgage provider Life insurance provider Tax office Contract providers Church community Business associates




When should I notify them of the death?


You should notify all of them as soon as possible after you have received the death certificate.





Body Repatriation

What does repatriation mean?


Seems like a big word – but definitely not as complicated as it sounds. Repatriation simply is the return of something to its country of origin. So in this circumstance, if someone died abroad you have the option to repatriate – return their body or ashes back to the UK.




What are the repatriation steps?


With a death occurring abroad it may feel like a very daunting experience and almost as if you don’t have control over the situation. If you have decided that a repatriation is the decision you would like to go with here are some steps for you to follow: Get an international reparation provider. Their job is to make the whole process simpler for you. Compare different prices, contact different people as this may be a costly process, spend within your budget, as funeral costs are still looming. As mentioned earlier you need to register their death in the country they died in. Register with the following information about the deceased and yourself. Full name Date of birth Passport number Where and when the passport was issued Details of the next-of-kin, if you're not the closest relative.




What is the repatriation process?


Preparing the body for repatriation Your repatriation provider will need to collect the following paperwork to begin the repatriation process: The local death certificate with a certified English translation The passport of the deceased who died Authorisation to take the body out of the country A certificate of embalming A “Freedom from infection” certificate A permit for the country the deceased will be travelling to (if needed) How do you repatriate a dead body to the UK? Bodies are taken back to the UK. In the process leading up to the reparation, the body will be embalmed. When the above paperwork is supplied, body of the person who has died will be shipped by an international air freight in a special zinc-lined coffin and can include requirements such as wrapping the coffin in hessian, or bubble-wrapping How long does it take to repatriate a body? This depends on the country, time zones, and cause of death. If the cause of death was natural, it can take anything between 5-7 days for the body to arrive in the UK. However if they died under suspicious circumstances, or perhaps an accident, death will need to be investigated, post- mortem conducted – where the body may be held by police. In these cases repatriation can take 10-15 days or even up to 3 months to complete. Can I take deceased ashes on a plane? If conducting a funeral abroad or if you were with the deceased when they died abroad, you are required to employ a local funeral director to arrange the cremation process. If you are unsure of where to start with this, you can contact the British consulate to help you find a suitable individual. Carrying ashes of a loved one with your luggage on a plane is accepted, most airlines require them to be stored in a suitable container. Also remember to carry with you the necessary documents, such as the death certificate or certificate of cremation. If the former is not the case and the loved one died alone abroad, and you wish to repatriate their ashes there are certain regulations that you may have to follow – depending on the country. However, a death certificate, certificate of cremation and the certificate of sealing are essentials. As well as air freight, ashes can be sent by courier and the cost is less expensive compared to shipping a body How much does repatriation cost? The cost of repatriation depends on several factors. These include the country where the body of the deceased is going to or coming from, who the reparation provider is, the type of coffin selected and whether the coffin must be hermetically sealed (airtight). Services such as organising a memorial ahead of a flight, cremation before a flight or visiting your loved one ahead of a flight may require an additional fee. Repatriation costs can range from £2,000 to as great as £17,000. Fees differ from one repatriation service provider to the next, so it is definitely handy to get a few quotations first before you make a final decision – so you can work within your budget. Does travel insurance cover repatriation of body? If your loved one had travel insurance, you may be able to claim the costs of the repatriation arrangements from this. Their insurance company should be contacted as soon as possible to see if this would be covered. If you are covered, the insurance company will most likely assign a local assistance firm to assist you with some things during the process.





 

Registering the Death of Your Loved One

What does repatriation mean?


Seems like a big word – but definitely not as complicated as it sounds. Repatriation simply is the return of something to its country of origin. So in this circumstance, if someone died abroad you have the option to repatriate – return their body or ashes back to the UK.




What are the repatriation steps?


With a death occurring abroad it may feel like a very daunting experience and almost as if you don’t have control over the situation. If you have decided that a repatriation is the decision you would like to go with here are some steps for you to follow: Get an international reparation provider. Their job is to make the whole process simpler for you. Compare different prices, contact different people as this may be a costly process, spend within your budget, as funeral costs are still looming. As mentioned earlier you need to register their death in the country they died in. Register with the following information about the deceased and yourself. Full name Date of birth Passport number Where and when the passport was issued Details of the next-of-kin, if you're not the closest relative.




What is the repatriation process?


Preparing the body for repatriation Your repatriation provider will need to collect the following paperwork to begin the repatriation process: The local death certificate with a certified English translation The passport of the deceased who died Authorisation to take the body out of the country A certificate of embalming A “Freedom from infection” certificate A permit for the country the deceased will be travelling to (if needed) How do you repatriate a dead body to the UK? Bodies are taken back to the UK. In the process leading up to the reparation, the body will be embalmed. When the above paperwork is supplied, body of the person who has died will be shipped by an international air freight in a special zinc-lined coffin and can include requirements such as wrapping the coffin in hessian, or bubble-wrapping How long does it take to repatriate a body? This depends on the country, time zones, and cause of death. If the cause of death was natural, it can take anything between 5-7 days for the body to arrive in the UK. However if they died under suspicious circumstances, or perhaps an accident, death will need to be investigated, post- mortem conducted – where the body may be held by police. In these cases repatriation can take 10-15 days or even up to 3 months to complete. Can I take deceased ashes on a plane? If conducting a funeral abroad or if you were with the deceased when they died abroad, you are required to employ a local funeral director to arrange the cremation process. If you are unsure of where to start with this, you can contact the British consulate to help you find a suitable individual. Carrying ashes of a loved one with your luggage on a plane is accepted, most airlines require them to be stored in a suitable container. Also remember to carry with you the necessary documents, such as the death certificate or certificate of cremation. If the former is not the case and the loved one died alone abroad, and you wish to repatriate their ashes there are certain regulations that you may have to follow – depending on the country. However, a death certificate, certificate of cremation and the certificate of sealing are essentials. As well as air freight, ashes can be sent by courier and the cost is less expensive compared to shipping a body How much does repatriation cost? The cost of repatriation depends on several factors. These include the country where the body of the deceased is going to or coming from, who the reparation provider is, the type of coffin selected and whether the coffin must be hermetically sealed (airtight). Services such as organising a memorial ahead of a flight, cremation before a flight or visiting your loved one ahead of a flight may require an additional fee. Repatriation costs can range from £2,000 to as great as £17,000. Fees differ from one repatriation service provider to the next, so it is definitely handy to get a few quotations first before you make a final decision – so you can work within your budget. Does travel insurance cover repatriation of body? If your loved one had travel insurance, you may be able to claim the costs of the repatriation arrangements from this. Their insurance company should be contacted as soon as possible to see if this would be covered. If you are covered, the insurance company will most likely assign a local assistance firm to assist you with some things during the process.





Who to Notify After a Death? 

 

Who to notify after a death?


Besides the somewhat burdening, agonising and exhausting process of informing family and friends of the death of a loved one, there are also other organisations that need to be informed too, a workplace, educational establishments, tax office are some of many that need to be informed. Tell Us Once is a free service that enables you to report a death to most government organisations at once, making the process easier and less exhausting and emotionally draining. When you use Tell Us Once, they will notify the following services: DWP pensions and benefits Personal tax Council tax Passport Driving licence Blue Badge Electoral register Some public sector pension schemes




Who else needs to be notified after death?


The financial institutions have established something similar to the government's tell us once system which is called the death notification Service. It is a free service that allows you to inform a number of banks and credit card companies about the death of your loved one at the same time. It does appear that individual contact needs to be made to other organisations to notify them of the death of your loved one. Bill providers Work place Educational institutions Mortgage provider Life insurance provider Tax office Contract providers Church community Business associates




When should I notify them of the death?


You should notify all of them as soon as possible after you have received the death certificate.





Organ Donation 

In Conclusion


We hope this step by step guide has somewhat eased what may be a very draining process. It is also important to notify the significant bodies so that financial stress will not be an option in the upcoming weeks. Also remember that funeral plans cannot take place until the death is registered. You can begin planning the funeral once you have completed and received the death certificate.





In Conclusion

In Conclusion


We hope this step by step guide has somewhat eased what may be a very draining process. It is also important to notify the significant bodies so that financial stress will not be an option in the upcoming weeks. Also remember that funeral plans cannot take place until the death is registered. You can begin planning the funeral once you have completed and received the death certificate.





 
 

Next Step: Funeral Planning

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